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Pan De Muerto

Pan De Muerto

This post is sponsored by the American Egg Board, all opinions are my own.

Today marks the 1st day of Dia de los Muertos!

If you’re not familiar, this holiday is celebrated in Mexico and in certain countries throughout Latin America, lasting 3 days to honor those who have passed. On the days leading up to the celebration, families start to set up altars dedicated to loved ones and pets that have passed–as a way to remember them and celebrate their spirits.

These altars can often be very, very elaborate. They’ll be adorned with pictures of the deceased, marigolds, their favorite alcohol, water, their favorite dishes, sugar skulls and items of theirs amongst other things. If you happen to be in Mexico during the celebration, you’ll often see an influx of marigolds all around because they are an important part of the celebration. These bright blooms are said to be used to guide the deceased to their altars, and illuminate the path to their graves. Pan de muerto is a big staple in this celebration, and bakeries in Mexico often start selling this bread in early October, because people love it so much.

Pan De Muerto

Last year, I made pan de muerto stuffed with pumpkin butter for my very first attempt, and it was a really good learning experience. This year, I decided to refine the recipe for it and added notes of orange, clove, ginger and cinnamon and really took my time forming each separate loaf. One of the things I learned was that this recipe requires your tender love and care. You need to take your time carefully forming the crossbones and really give it some time to rise after it all comes together or it won’t cooperate with you while it bakes.

In honor of Dia de los Muertos, I teamed up with the American Egg Board to create this traditional recipe for you to enjoy! For more flavorful and Latin-inspired recipes, visit IncredibleEgg.org and Incredible Egg’s Hispanic Heritage Month section and check them out on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest and YouTube.

Pan De Muerto

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Baked Crema Mexicana Donuts

Baked Crema Mexicana DonutsIt’s Thursday!

AKA T-2 Weeks till I get to go to Colima for the weekend to celebrate my birthday con mis abuelitos! AHH!

Lately, I’ve been stumbling upon a ton of old music I used to hear around me when I was younger and it’s put me in a very nostalgic mood.

Bring on the feels!

Do you have any songs that take you back to your childhood?

Baked Crema Mexicana Donuts

When I was younger, every Sunday, like clockwork, mí  papá would wake me up at 6 am so I could go out to Riverside with him para la leche caliente.

If you’re not sure what that is, people would head out to someone’s ranch where they’d milk the cows and we’d all drink the fresh warm milk (hence leche caliente) con chocolate y ellos con piquete.

We did that every single Sunday, but we always stopped to grab donuts. It used to really annoy me, but my dad always had the same CD’s on rotation –which included Pedrito Fernandez, Chelo, Lorenzo De Monteclaro, and occasionally something with banda in it.

I don’t think I’ll ever forget the lyrics to  “La de la Mochila Azúl”.

Baked Crema Mexicana Donuts

I can’t even tell you how many times we watched Pedrito’s films either.

What did your parents listen to?

It’s funny to think how much more you start to appreciate the little things as you get older.

Sidenote–What is going on with trans rights in schools being rolled back? I.AM.NOT.HERE.FOR.IT

Trans rights are Human rights, Trans rights are Human rights, Trans rights are Human rights jfc.

Anyways before I get heated, aquí los dejo con la canción, y unas donas.

And as always, Stay chingonx y #ProtectTransKids!

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Pumpkin Butter Pan de Muerto

Pumpkin Butter Pan de Muerto

Día de los Muertos is coming up in a few days where November 1st is recognized as Día de los Angelitos (Day of the Angels), and November 2nd is known as Día de los Muertos (Day of the Dead). During these days, families of those who have departed get together to celebrate life, and the return of their spirits to earth.

Pumpkin Butter Pan de Muerto

On the days leading up to Día De los Muertos, altars are set up for family members who have passed. These altars are usually adorned with pictures of the deceased, sugar skulls with their name on them, their favorite dishes, marigolds, a glass of water, and Pan de Muerto to name a few things.

Pan de Muerto has ties to Christianity, and it symbolizes the eucharist, because the bread bears the cross on the top. Other times Pan de Muerto is topped with sesame seeds to represent the tears of the deceased souls that haven’t been able to find peace.

Pumpkin Butter Pan de Muerto

When I was brainstorming what to contribute to Sara’s #VirtualPumpkinParty, I started thinking about the Empanada Festival that happened outside of our hotel during our recent trip to Mexico. At night, the entire jardín was filled with local bakers selling their empanadas. Some of the empanadas were sweet, and others were savory but all equally delicious. I was originally set on making empanadas until I realized this would be a good opportunity to show you guys how to make Pan de Muerto filled with pumpkin butter in anticipation of the holiday.

Pumpkin Butter Pan de Muerto

Check out some of the other contributions by searching #VirtualPumpkinParty across social media, or check out some of my favorite recipes like Brett’s Pumpkin Granola which I’ll probs be making every day until Christmas, or Billy’s Pumpkin Butterscotch Sauce you’ll want to bathe in and Adrianna’s cozy af Pumpkin Chai Scones.

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